One of the flashpoints of the disintegration of the U.S.A., Utah is today a resolved, homogenous, Christian nation, isolated from its detractors and determined to survive these tumultuous times. Utah's Smith Law made the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints the official state religion, sparking a firestorm of religious reaction across the nation, and forcing a new exodus of LDS members to Utah. The Republic of Texas cited the Federal government's inability to enforce the Constitutional separation of Church and State in its Declaration of Secession on January 1, 1930, as did California and New York. The departure of these states triggered the general collapse of the U.S. in the following six months.

Utah accordingly has no real allies on the Continent; the only real candidate for alliance is the equally Christian People's Collective, which the Church opposes for it's Socialist doctrine. Political pressure may heal the standing rift between the two Christian nations, but no real progress has yet been made. On the other hand, Utah has few active enemies—Hollywood has bigger fish to fry; Texas is occupied with problems closer to home; Arixo is preparing for conflict with Texas (as well as Hollywood and Free Colorado air-pirates); Pacifica is likewise concerned with Alaska, Hollywood, and Pacific trade concerns.

The Navajo Nation is willing to cooperate with Utah against air pirates, as shown in the 1936 Plateau Wars, but shows no interest in a long standing relationship. While not an enemy per se, Free Colorado is a perpetual thorn in Utah's side, as Colorado pirates strike out of the Rockies and flee back across the Colorado border, where Colorado militias wait for Utah planes.

Utah is one of the few states expanding its territory: Utah colonists are staking claims to the disputed western territories, and Utah claims that LDS-settled land is under its jurisdiction. If anything sparks a war with Utah, this is likely to be it.

Utah’s government is something of an oddity in North America: a participatory democracy, similar in structure to the old United States government, it is also very much a theocracy. This unusual hybrid of church and state typically means that people in positions of power within the Church of Latter Day Saints frequently hold high political office, as well.

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License